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Teen Kids News (Episode 1216)

3 minutes

(Describer) Title: Teen Kids News Top Story.

Headaches can be a huge pain. For some teens who get an extreme type of headache, it's an even bigger problem.

(male reporter) When Daniel complained about constant headaches, people thought he was making excuses. But his headaches were real and more severe than normal. I had it for a week-- two a day.

(reporter) That was during the summer. School started, and Daniel's headaches began to get in the way. I'd have to be in a dark room, away from noise, 'cause that makes the headaches worse. I had to step aside for at least an hour and let it subside.

(reporter) The headaches were affecting Daniel's schoolwork. He and his mother went to the North Shore University Hospital's Headache Center. There, they met Dr. Noah Rosen. The doctor discovered Daniel's headaches weren't just headaches. They were migraines. A migraine doesn't feel like a typical headache. It can feel like a throbbing, an exploding, a crushing pain. It can feel like nothing else that you've ever experienced.

(reporter) Migraines tend to occur on only one side of the head. The biggest sign you have them is if they interfere in your daily life. This matched Daniel's symptoms, but his mother questioned them. I ignored it for a year and a half. It started when he went to camp. I said he was making excuses. A year and a half later, this is more than an excuse. Like many boys, he's been told that, first off, adolescents don't get migraines, and also that it's only a problem with girls. And both of those are untrue.

(reporter) What is true is, girls are more likely to get migraines. Boy or girl, the pain can be really bad. I couldn't concentrate. I couldn't spell. I had word-finding issues. So I had to go to the doctor.

(Describer) Rosen:

One of the most important things to keep an eye out for are the triggers of the headache.

(reporter) That means finding out what causes your migraines. Some common triggers are... Even if you avoid the triggers, you might still get migraines. A doctor may prescribe medication. Unfortunately, studies show that most teens don't seek the treatment they need. When the pain is severe, it's not the right thing to ignore it. Ignoring the problem can make it a lot worse. It's important people go to their doctor so they can get the diagnosis and the appropriate treatment.

(Describer) Daniel sketches.

(reporter) And with that treatment, life can go back to being normal.

(Describer) Daniel:

(Daniel) I don't have to worry about going out and worrying if I'm going to have a headache.

(Describer) He plays frisbee. Tyler:

If you think your headaches might be migraines, get help.

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This segment tackles migraine headaches and how they can interfere with daily life. Experts also discuss the triggers associated with migraines such as caffeine, dehydration, and stress. Part of the "Teen Kids News" series.

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