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The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab: Introduction

2 minutes

(Describer) Symone Johnson:

The remarkable horseshoe crab. They are called living fossils because they have changed very little in the last 450 million years. Although they are called crabs, they are more closely related to spiders and scorpions, and their annual mating migration is an incredible sight to see. The Ocean Today crew documented their yearly spawning ritual on Delaware Bay beaches, where thousands come ashore during the full moon in late spring.

(Describer) A woman approaches some.

Yearly, volunteers travel to the Atlantic Coast in May or June to count crabs and births. Four females and eleven males. Okay. Learn why you should thank a horseshoe crab when you next have a flu shot. Discover how red knots, travelers from South America, count on eating a lot of crab eggs to fuel an epic journey to their Arctic breeding grounds.

(Describer) Many take off together.

There is much to see and learn about the remarkable horseshoe crab, so let's get started.

(Describer) Accessibility provided by the US Department of Education.

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Horseshoe crabs are "living fossils" more closely related to spiders and scorpions than they are to crabs. They get their name from the smooth, hard shell (exoskeleton) that is shaped like a horseshoe. Part of "The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab" series.

Media Details

Runtime: 2 minutes

The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab
Episode 1
2 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab
Episode 2
2 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab
Episode 3
3 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab
Episode 4
3 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
The Remarkable Horseshoe Crab
Episode 5
3 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12