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Media Accessibility Information, Guidelines and Research

Access: Realtime Speech-to-Text Module

[Eligible for RID CEUs] Access: Realtime Speech-to-Text is a comprehensive overview of realtime speech-to-text services. This course provides information about various types of speech-to-text services; including details on training, equipment needed, and hourly pay.  It explains the importance of quality services and how to find and retain qualified service providers.  Laws pertaining to realtime communication access are also discussed.

While designed for disability service professionals and administrators working in secondary and postsecondary education, anyone wanting to learn more about realtime speech-to-text services will find the training informative and beneficial.

Participants who successfully complete the training may download and print a file issued by DCMP that verifies completion of 1.5 hours of training.

RID CEUs now available

This online module has been approved for RID CEUs. DCMP is an Approved RID CMP Sponsor for Continuing Education Activities. This General Studies program is offered for 0.15 CEUs at the “little/none” Content Knowledge Level.

Once you have successfully completed the module a link to the “Verification of Completion” will become available. On that page you’ll be able to request CEUs.

CEU information for this training is submitted to RID the first week of each month. If you complete the training in August, your CEUs will be reported in September. If you have any questions, please contact Cindy Camp at ccamp@dcmp.org.

Support Documents

2009 PEPNet Postsecondary Interpreting and Speech-to-Text Survey Summary

This report includes the results of a 2009 national survey of 123 postsecondary institutions regarding salary and wages of interpreting and speech to text providers, and also information about program size and institutional practices and policies. The information may be helpful  in raising hiring standards, comparing salaries/wages, creating/reviewing new and existing accessibility policies, determining best practices for a campus, finding/contacting similar programs, and improve services for students.

Fast Facts: Speech-to-Text Services: Hiring Qualified Providers

Speech-to-text is one method of providing effective communication access under the law. However, it is more than simply providing technology, it requires the provision of effective services, and speech-to-text services are only as good as the skills of the service provider. When hiring a service provider, a number of qualification factors must be considered. It is imperative that institutions evaluate the quality of service to ensure that effective, real-time communication access is occurring.

An Overview of Real-time Captioning

Today’s technology affords individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing access to the world like never before. Speech-to-text technology is one such tool that brings access to individuals who are visual communicators. “Speech-to-text” is an umbrella term used to describe an accommodation where spoken communication and other auditory information are translated into text in real-time. A service provider types what is heard and the text appears on a screen for the consumer to read. There are three main systems which are used to provide real-time captioning: 1) Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART), 2) C-Print®, and 3) TypeWell.

Dual Accommodations: Using Interpreters and Speech-to-Text Services

Providing interpreting and speech-to-text services is a commonplace accommodation in settings where an audience is comprised of several individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing who rely on different communication modes (e.g., ASL, lip reading, etc.). This type of accommodation most often occurs at large magnet events such as conferences. Dual accommodation for an individual student in a postsecondary setting occurs less frequently, but is appropriate under certain circumstances. 

Hiring Qualified Speech-to-Text Service Providers

Speech-to-text is one method of providing effective communication access under the law. However, it is more than simply providing technology, it requires the provision of effective services, and speech-to-text services are only as good as the skills of the service provider. When hiring a service provider, a number of qualification factors must be considered. It is imperative that institutions evaluate the quality of service to ensure that effective, real-time communication access is occurring.

Remote Speech-to-Text Services

Speech-to-text services can be provided onsite or remotely. Onsite speech-to-text services refers to the service provider and consumer being in the same location. Remote speech-to-text services refers to the service provider and consumer being in different locations.   With remote speech-to-text services, the provider, often referred to as a captioner, captionist or transcriber, accesses audio content via a telephone line or video conferencing software. The service provider and consumer use software to connect their computers over the Internet so what is typed is viewed on both screens. Many systems allow the consumer to use any device that can connect to the Internet: laptop, tablet, or smartphone.




Tags: module, pepnet

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