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Career Connections: CNC Die Shop Machinist

4 minutes

(man) My job at Hirschvogel is I'm responsible for making dies and various tools in our die shop. A die is a negative mold. Parts are formed inside of these tools. One example would be a pinion shaft in a car, which is a component of the transmission or of a rear end that is a driven gear. That part is forced into a die. Various punches make this tool and it is ejected out. To get into the machining trade, to be hired by a company, usually they're looking for technical school training or college, associate's degrees. You can enter with a high school diploma, but it's much more difficult without some sort of past experience. The training at Hirschvogel consists of being placed with an experienced machinist. You learn his or her day-to-day job duties, and they teach you the various skills that you'll need to know to perform that job. My goals for myself, I wish to further my technical knowledge more, even within the die shop, and also further my knowledge about the company overall, as far as their processes in the United States and in other Hirschvogel plants around the world. We send many people from all departments of the company to Germany for training, not only in their job, but also to experience the culture and further their skills more so there. Technology's involved in most all machining processes. Most machines we use in our die shop are CNC machines, computer numerical controlled machines. The CNC machine that I run is a CNC lathe. We program this machine to turn dies. That involves taking a blueprint, reading and understanding what is on that print and then programming the machine to perform those steps in the order that I choose. My typical job flow in the die shop consists of receiving parts back from the heat treat process, where they're already hardened. Then I will evaluate the part, look at the blueprints and determine what needs to be done to that part. I'll then program the CNC machine to produce the part correctly, select my tooling, process the part through hard turning, and on to operations after that.

Funding to purchase and make this educational production accessible was provided by the U.S. Department of Education:

PH: 1-800-USA-LEARN (V) or WEB: www.ed.gov.

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Workers with computer skills have the best job prospects among those seeking employment as machinists and tool die makers. A die shop machinist offers a close up of a computer numerical control (CNC) die shop. Part of the "Career Connections" series.

Media Details

Runtime: 4 minutes

Career Connections
Episode 1
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 2
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 3
3 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 4
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 5
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 6
4 minutes
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Career Connections
Episode 7
7 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 8
7 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 9
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 10
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12