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Career Connections: Marketing & PR Director

6 minutes

(Describer) Beside four different-size different-color circles connected by lines, title: Career Connections. Under a line graph, title: Financial Literacy.

(Describer) Title: Marketing and PR Director.

(Describer) A man sits in front of a line of hockey jerseys.

I'm Sean Lynn, director of marketing for U.S. Bank Arena, Cincinnati Cyclones, and Nederlander Entertainment. When it comes to financial literacy, making sure that the consumer is well-informed, we see ourselves as a value proposition, especially on the side of the Cincinnati Cyclones. There is no better value in town. We provide action on the ice and off the ice. Whether you're young, old, male, female, we've got something for you, and there's no better deal.

(Describer) He works at a laptop.

One idea that sticks out when it comes to value proposition is "kids eat free" night. We were brainstorming for a promotional schedule years ago. "Kids eat free" was popular with local restaurants, and I took it to my manager and said, "This can work." You're not only giving mom a ticket, but she knows that her children will also eat for free. We're an easy choice when moms decide what her discretionary income is going to. With any minor league team, promotions play a major role. It's not just a hockey game, but superhero night or a bobblehead giveaway or a kid's jersey night. We entertain people with more than just hockey. It's a full night of entertainment. When you walk away, you feel good about the dollars you've spent. One of our exciting promotions is our threshold promotion at every game. If we score five goals and win, you get a free burrito. If we score first in the first period, it's a free appetizer. We build more value to consumers when they come to games. We've had games where so many thresholds were reached that fans make money on the ticket. We've given $25 worth of value on a $13 ticket. It seems backwards, but this separates us from our competition. We host a teddy bear toss, where, after the first goal, patrons throw teddy bears onto the ice. Those teddy bears are given to the police. They use them as ride-along bears. If a child needs comforting, the bear is given to the child. It's these community initiatives that touch people on that personal level. We really see something rewarding, both in the stands, and then just on that personal level.

(Describer) A player, child and policeman pose for a photo.

No day is really average. Every day is something different. It can be anything from media buys to promotions to community experiences, community relations, appearances, what have you. That's the great part. Every day is different. It's not just swinging a hammer. It's coming to work every day knowing it will be different. There's something certainly exciting about that. My career path was different than most. I didn't know what I wanted to be. I took a marketing class my senior year and loved it. Ended up taking an internship in Cincinnati with Clear Channel Entertainment at Riverbend. Did that unpaid, driving every day for 18 months. Then through the network I kind of created, find out about the job opportunity here, interviewed, and I'm 10 years strong now. In college, I had two great experiences that shaped my future career. Number one was a marketing class. The teacher gave us a project to sell widgets, and we came up with a marketing plan to sell these items. We chose a music festival and came up with a great experience. Just through that, selling a simple fictional product, I came to love informing the consumer and helping them spend that discretionary income. If I was to give advice to a student who wanted to follow this path, it'd be twofold: Number one, don't be scared of the work. Do many internships. You're going to experience different things through every single turn of that internship. Everything culminates to make you a well-rounded candidate. The other thing is don't be scared to pick up the phone. Everybody wants to e-mail or go through social media. There's still something personal about a phone call. Schedules can be tough and tight, but don't be scared to answer your phone or return phone calls. Number one thing I enjoy is knowing everything is different from day to day.

(Describer) Small dogs race across the ice.

Number two is it's rewarding, and you get to see that reward. You host a hockey game, you walk out, and when those lights come up, you can see the smiles on people's faces, especially kids. It's great knowing you had something to do with making memories for that family or that individual.

Funding to purchase and make this educational production

(Describer) Titles: For more information, visit OhioMeansJobs.com. CET, Think TV, Public Media Connect. Copyright 2014. Funding to purchase and make this educational program accessible was provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Contact the Department of Education by telephone at 1-800-USA-LEARN, or online at www.ed.gov.

accessible was provided by the U.S. Department of Education:

PH: 1-800-USA-LEARN (V) or WEB: www.ed.gov.

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A public relations professional with a passion for affordable family entertainment explains how a marketing class he took in college led to a rewarding career with the Cincinnati Cyclones, a minor-league hockey team. Part of the "Career Connections" series.

Media Details

Runtime: 6 minutes

Career Connections
Episode 1
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 2
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 3
3 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 4
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 5
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 6
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 7
7 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 8
7 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 9
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 10
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12