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Career Connections: Restaurant Management

9 minutes

(Describer) Beside four different-size different-color circles connected by lines, title: Career Connections. Surrounded by different color stripes, title: Fine Arts. Under a world map with dots in various locations, title: World Languages. Under a line graph, title: Financial Literacy.

(Describer) Title: Restaurant Management.

(Describer) At a restaurant, several people sit around a table while a waitress passes out checks.

(male narrator) Have you ever wondered why your favorite restaurant runs so smoothly? Most likely, the restaurant manager is responsible. Restaurant managers are in charge of the restaurant during business hours. It is their responsibility to ensure that customers are treated right and enjoy their dining experience. We will look deeper into restaurant management and find out more about this career path.

(Describer) Title: What types of things do you do on your job? Jonathan Segaser, Sebastianos Italiano Restaurant:

As a restaurant manager, some of the daily activities I have to take care of are making sure that I'm properly scheduled for the day, week, and month, making sure that my staff is taken care of-- that they're paid, well-rested, that they feel important, that they want to be here.

(female) It's interacting with your employees. It's interviewing to hire new employees. It's greeting your customers and going around to tables and seeing how they're enjoying their food. You're going to be involved with purchasing of food-- maybe not be personally, but possibly supervising people that purchase food for you-- receiving food, putting away stock, taking inventories.

(male) My job duties are to oversee the whole operation.

(Describer) Magdy AbouZied:

Three elements you always think about-- the customer, which is come first, then your employees, and if you are making money for the institute you're working for.

(Describer) Title: What subjects should I be focusing on now if I want to become a restaurant manager later? AbouZied:

I would recommend math, science, 'cause basically food, it's a science. The psychology subject is very essential as well because you're dealing with a lot of employees and you gotta know how to treat them and how to deal with different type of personality.

(Segaser) Finance--maybe take some basic business courses.

(Describer) Segaser:

Ultimately, you're responsible. You'll need to know those things for payroll, tax, and inventory purposes, for ordering. That's the meat of your business.

(Describer) Title: Why should I have a good understanding of the fine arts? Susan Sadoff, Carillion at Bowling Green State University:

You can use what you learn about arts in how you display and present your food. This is a buffet. We look at the line and how it flows, how the colors flow. Like on a salad bar, paying attention to-- you're almost painting a picture. You want to make sure that the food looks beautiful because people will want it. It's gotta be inviting.

(Describer) AbouZied:

You gotta feel really good when you're walking in. Let's start with the atmosphere itself. If we are not serving food with art there, it won't be attractive and you won't enjoy it.

(male #2) No wants to eat anything that doesn't look good.

(Describer) Patrick Hannan:

When most people walk into an establishment and if it is not clean and crisp and you are not engaged, it's not gonna work. So you have to have an understanding of the culture of fine arts in order to be successful in this business.

(Describer) Title: Why is financial literacy important on your job? AbouZied, The Oaks at Bowling Green State University:

It's essential that you have a financial background-- how to analyze invoice, how to negotiate prices. You have to be educated about how much even the produce they sent or how much the meat. Food service is a business like any other business. It's important that the students get a fundamental base on a 101. Understanding what profit and loss is

(Describer) Hannan:

and understanding a profit and loss statement and what the difference between black and red is. When you have those analytical skills, you're gonna be looking at data, and data is numbers. When we look at metrics, you can spot trends.

(Describer) Title: Will I need to know any world languages?

(Describer) AbouZied:

You meet and serve a lot of people from different ground or from different countries. By having different language or knowing different language, how to speak it, that's really good for you to attract such business and communicate with people, help them out and help the business.

(Describer) Hannan:

I speak fluent Spanish, and I learned that from the kitchen. I did work in Spanish in high school, and I wish I would have taken it more in college. When I got into journeying in the kitchen, Spanish was a language that I learned by listening. Being creative and understanding foods of other cultures

(Describer) Sadoff:

and just learning about other cultures can help you plan menus or plan specials. One of the most fun things that we do is have theme meals. It breaks the monotony of the day-to-day services. We may do some research into, let's say, Ecuador or Italy or Spain and create menus based on those countries, those regions.

(Describer) Title: What do you enjoy most about you job?

(Describer) Sadoff:

I really enjoy the diversity that we have here. We have people from all different kinds of backgrounds, people from all different kinds of countries. We have some people that are from Japan, Poland, Mexico. They're transplants that have come to work for us. We're a very interesting, fun crew. Every day at work, someone makes me smile or laugh out loud. You can't beat that at any job.

(Describer) AbouZied:

I think it's the reward every day. By the time they leave and they said, "It's an excellent place," and "You made my day," or "You're a great cook" or "great manager" or "great chef." I think you get your reward right away, feeling good about your work. It's a passion.

(Describer) Hannan:

If you don't have passion and drive, you'll burn out real quick. It's a matter of passion for the food, also with it coming out of the ground and really caring about health and wellness.

(Segaser) It's such a dynamic environment. You do the same things every single day. That's fine. That's part of the routine. Every day, you're dealing with different people. Your guests are different. They have different experiences and want a different experience at the restaurant.

(Describer) Segaser:

That's pretty exciting. The menu and the drinks rotate and that changes. That's fun, learning new things and dealing with new people on a constant basis.

Funding to purchase and make this educational production

(Describer) Titles: For more information, visit OhioMeansJobs.com WBGU-TV Public Television - watch, connect, explore. Copyright 2014. Funding to purchase and make this educational program accessible was provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Contact the Department of Education by telephone at 1-800-USA-LEARN, or online at www.ed.gov.

accessible was provided by the U.S. Department of Education:

PH: 1-800-USA-LEARN (V) or WEB: www.ed.gov.

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Viewers will learn why having knowledge and competence in customer service, world languages, fine arts, and financial literacy are critical for a restaurant manager. Part of the "Career Connections" series.

Media Details

Runtime: 9 minutes

Career Connections
Episode 1
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 2
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 3
3 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 4
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 5
5 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 6
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 7
7 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 8
7 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 9
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Career Connections
Episode 10
6 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12