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  • How Computers Compute

    Most computers are super high-tech machines with tiny parts, but they can also be huge, wooden, and mechanical. It's what they have in common that makes them computers. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 5 minutes Date: February 21st, 2017 at 12:23 PM

  • Morality in the Marketplace

    Do businesses operate with a sense of right and wrong? The truth is that most businesses are ethical. Indeed, the more ethical they are, the more they succeed because consumers often vote with their wallets, choosing to deal with those who create positive results in society. Scholar Johan Norberg visits Whole Foods where they ensure the principles of morality in the marketplace govern their decisions.

    Production Year: 2016
    Running Time: 13 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 03:35 PM

  • Default: The Student Loan Documentary

    Financing college is a challenge many students face. Follow the stories of borrowers from different backgrounds affected by the student lending industry. No matter when their loans were taken, many borrowers find themselves in a paralyzing predicament of repaying two, three, or multiple times the original amount borrowed. Currently borrowers have no bankruptcy protection, no cap on fees and penalties, and no recourse to law after graduating from college. The consequences are dire for students who are unable to repay their loans.

    Production Year: 2012
    Running Time: 27 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 03:35 PM

  • Exoplanets: Planets Outside Our Solar System

    Astronomers are beginning to locate thousands of planets that exist outside of the solar system. Scientists provide a behind-the-scenes look at the simple technique that astronomers are using to discover these curious new planets. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 4 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM

  • Humanoid Robot Brains

    The smartest people in the world have spent millions of dollars trying to develop high-tech robots. Even though technology has come a long way, these humanoid robots are nowhere close to having the "brain" and motor control of a human. Why is that? A MIT scientist explains the motor control processes in the human brain, and how cutting-edge research is trying to implement it in robots. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 6 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM

  • Squid Skin With a Mind of Its Own

    When the nerve cells of squid suffer an injury, something unexpected happens with the tiny pouches of colored pigment, called chromatophores. A MIT scientist discusses this phenomenon, and how it can be used and modeled on the computer with some surprisingly simple rules. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 5 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM

  • Growing Nanotube Forests

    What if scientists could grow elevators to space? Or make phones that last for weeks without a charge? These things could be possible someday with an amazing material like carbon nanotubes. A MIT scientist discusses the curious way researchers create this super-material. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 4 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM

  • Engineering Engines: What Do Horses, Cars, and Planes Have in Common?

    Ever wondered what horsepower really means, and what horses have to do with other modes of transportation? MIT scientists explain how engines work in various machines, including the surprising ways that they're all related. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 4 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM

  • The Science of Bouncing

    Think all squash balls bounce the same? Think again! Two MIT scientists look into what makes things bounce better than others. Ready for some physics? Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 6 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM

  • The Physics of Invisibility Cloaks

    It's not just movie magic, discover the science behind invisibility cloaks. Two MIT scientists explain the physics of light and how an invisible cloak could theoretically work. Part of the "Science Out Loud" series.

    Production Year: 2014
    Running Time: 6 minutes Date: February 14th, 2017 at 10:28 AM