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Science Nation: Preparing a Workforce for Advanced Manufacturing

3 minutes

(Describer) Streams of light collide to create a globe filled with water. Title: Science Nation. A man looks at video on a monitor.

[explosion]

You can see the bone model there and cartilage underneath it.

(male narrator) ConMed Linvatec makes an array of medical devices, including many to repair knees, hips, and shoulders.

(Describer) William Mazurek:

It's the foundation of our core technology, of our people, through training, education, that makes the difference. We can't recruit them fast enough.

(narrator) With support from the National Science Foundation, engineer Marilyn Barger directs the Florida Advanced Technological Education Center, or FLATE, to create statewide programs to prepare workers for high-tech manufacturing jobs.

(Barger) They are getting skills that are very transferable across different areas in technology. There's a lot of things they learn in the advanced manufacturing track that might apply in optics or machining and metal fabrication.

(Describer) A man leads a class.

They're expressed in terms of maximum interrupting voltage.

(narrator) The FLATE curriculum focuses on skills needed to excel in today's advanced manufacturing workplace.

(Describer) Richard Gilbert:

We came up with a structured degree program that includes electronics, hydraulics, pneumatics, automation, and includes sensor technologies and process control. We work with industry, and they begin defining

(Describer) Carlos Soto:

what these workers are expected to do.

(Describer) Student Gabriel Fleming:

I wanted to start working on linear accelerators-- hospital equipment that treats cancer patients.

(narrator) Many students enter these programs with college degrees or with military or work experience to improve their prospects for the future.

(Describer) Student Byron Taylor:

(man) The best part to this program was to take what you've done before and put your hands on.

(narrator) These students know that contemporary manufacturing jobs require a higher skill set than those of yesterday's assembly line worker. Very clean, very innovative,

(Describer) Bradley Jenkins:

and people make good money at that.

(Describer) John Wiencek:

It's a wise move to have some manufacturing in the States for quality reasons, security reasons, or because the latest technology is only available here.

(narrator) The National Association of Manufacturers says there are as many as 600,000 skilled manufacturing positions vacant in the U.S. The folks at FLATE are working to change that by engineering a high-tech workforce trained for success.

(Describer) A globe turns by the title.

For Science Nation, I'm Miles O'Brien.

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The Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Program at the National Science Foundation focuses on the education of technicians for high technology fields. ATE supports rigorous educational programs that incorporate industry recognized skills and competencies to prepare a qualified technical workforce for industries that are vitally important to the nation’s prosperity and security. Part of the National Science Foundation Series “Science Nation.”

Media Details

Runtime: 3 minutes

Science Nation
Episode 1
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 2
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 3
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 4
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 5
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 6
4 minutes
Grade Level: 9 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 7
4 minutes
Grade Level: 9 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 8
4 minutes
Grade Level: 9 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 9
4 minutes
Grade Level: 7 - 12
Science Nation
Episode 10
4 minutes
Grade Level: 10 - 12