Ask a Scientist: How Can I Watch the Solar Eclipse Safely?

1 minute

In order to view the solar eclipse safely-- during the eclipse itself, the totality occurs-- if you're in the path of totality, it takes about-- totality occurs for about 2 1/2 minutes. Outside of totality, you want wear your solar eclipse glasses, and I have a pair right here. These glasses block out about 99.99% of the sunlight. That allows you to view the eclipse-- or view before and after the total part of the eclipse. But when totality occurs, you want to whip off your glasses, and then you'll be able to see the total eclipse, and you'll be able to see the corona, which is the area around the sun. You'll see this beautiful tenuous atmosphere of the sun. Accessibility provided by the U.S. Department of Education.


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David Boboltz of the National Science Foundation provides tips for safely viewing the solar eclipse. He advises viewers to use the appropriate glasses leading up to and after the moment of totality.

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